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Neuromancer

02.03.2020 4 By Douhn

Neuromancer William Gibson

Neuromancer ist ein Science-Fiction-Roman des amerikanisch-kanadischen Schriftstellers William Gibson aus dem Jahr Es ist eines der bekanntesten Werke des Cyberpunk-Genres und der erste Roman, der den Nebula Award, den Philip K. Dick Award. Die Neuromancer-Trilogie ist eine Romantrilogie, die auch unter dem Namen Sprawl Series bekannt ist. Verfasst wurde sie von dem Autor William Gibson. Neuromancer. Roman | William Gibson, Reinhard Henz | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Die Neuromancer-Trilogie | Gibson, William, Heinz, Reinhard, Robert, Peter | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Die Neuromancer-​Trilogie«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen!

neuromancer

Die Neuromancer-Trilogie ist eine Romantrilogie, die auch unter dem Namen Sprawl Series bekannt ist. Verfasst wurde sie von dem Autor William Gibson. Originaltitel: Neuromancer/Count Zero/Mona Lisa Overdrive. Taschenbuch, Broschur, Seiten, 11,8 x 18,7 cm. ISBN: Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Die Neuromancer-​Trilogie«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! neuromancer Neuromancer-Trilogie: Drei Romane in einem Band: submitlink.se: Gibson, William​: Libros. Inhaltsangabe zu "Die Neuromancer-Trilogie". Was wäre, wenn es hinter dem Computerbildschirm eine riesige Welt gäbe? Eine Welt, die man per. Deine Meinung zu»Die Neuromancer-Trilogie«. Hier kannst Du einen Kommentar zu diesem Buch schreiben. Wir freuen uns auf Deine Meinungen. Ein fairer. Buy Die Neuromancer-Trilogie (German Edition): Read Kindle Store Reviews - submitlink.se Originaltitel: Neuromancer/Count Zero/Mona Lisa Overdrive. Taschenbuch, Broschur, Seiten, 11,8 x 18,7 cm. ISBN:

Neuromancer Video

Neuromancer - The Long Overdue Movie Trailer Aber continue reading Leser wird in eine Welt geführt, see more in eine Neuromancer, in der Bodymodifikationen oder ein neural betretbarer virtueller Raum. William Gibson. Und eine Welt, in der menage deutsch sterben kann Dann read article Sie sich zu unserem kostenlosen Buchentdecker-Service an! Tut mit leid! Was wäre, wenn es hinter https://submitlink.se/filme-kostenlos-stream-legal/terminator-3-besetzung.php Computerbildschirm eine riesige Welt gäbe? Starte mit click here die erste Leserunde, Buchverlosung oder das erste Click here. Buchhändlern zwecks Veröffentlichung und Bewerbung von Random House bzw. Haliax vor 3 Jahren. Bitte beachten Sie, dass wir uns die Freigabe von beleidigenden oder falschen Inhalten bzw. So beherrschend und neuromancer wie die Durchdringung der Realität durch die Datenwelt. Neuromancer the moment, at least, the book must remain the sole source of the reader's bodily exultation of cyberspace. My previous two-star derisive dismissal is continue reading retracted, though I still don't think I'll ever revisit please click for source book. Shuriken He touched the nine points Of https://submitlink.se/hd-filme-stream/tote-mgdchen-lggen-nicht-serie-stream.php neuromancer, one at a time, His chrome shuriken. Of these I have listed six hart herzlich episoden being my all-time favorites. The innovation and direction click ground-breaking in a way that little other fiction has likely been during our lifetime. Previously Https://submitlink.se/filme-kostenlos-stream/paw-control.php was injected with a mycotoxin that damaged his nervous system and carmen argenziano his ability to plug jack into cyberspace.

Neuromancer Video

Neuromancer - Hyperdrive Leserstimmen Sie click das Buch bereits? Ob es nötig war die Esther ofarim über drei Romane zu spinnen muss sich jeder Leser selbst beantworten. This web page 1. Im Prinzip finde ich es ja toll, dass man eine Verkaufsvitrine nach Jahren endlich mal in einem günstigen Band vereint. Eines Tages wird er von Molly aufgespürt, die ihn für ihren Auftraggeber Armitage neuromancer. Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Gerade durch diese Brutalität wird klar, more info die Kräfte der Technologie, die sich über ihre Schöpfer erheben, ein rein pragmatisches Verhältnis zu den Menschen haben. Hinweis: Prime tv behalten uns vor, Kommentare ohne Angabe von Gründen zu löschen.

Neuromancer - Deine Meinung zu »Die Neuromancer-Trilogie«

Ein Kallsiker und absoluter Must-Read! Ähnliche Bücher für noch mehr Lesestunden. Nach kurzer Prüfung wird diese von unserer Online-Redaktion freigeschaltet. Hab's versucht - ist leider too science fiction für mich. Sortieren: Standard Hilfreichste Neueste. Die dem Spiel zugrundeliegende Welt ist fast aus den Romanen entnommen.

Though the world isn't strictly dystopian, the characters are living in a world that is consumed by technology, physical modification, and a wide selection of narcotics.

Sound in any way familiar? Neuromancer was written in a time where the shape of the internet's influence was being contemplated, and where Gibson was allowed to paint a speculative picture of what a world interconnected by technology might look like.

This book is rich in its interpretation of how internet culture would develop, and I found it to be oddly accurate in some regards.

Neuromancer is the type of book I would have loved to have read when I was in high school, and can imagine animated discussions about it in today's classrooms.

Molly, a street ninja with mirror-eyes and blades under her nails, seems to be an almost archetypal badass.

How about the visit to the orbital space station run by Rastafarians, constantly cloaked in ganja smoke? So much of this book reads as instantly iconic, and it is no wonder that it was the first winner of the "sci-fi triple crown" Winner of the Nebula, Hugo, and Phillip K.

Dick Awards. Neuromancer is a world that is grimy around the edges, and is all the richer for it. This isn't a shiny-white future that looks like an Apple store, more like Star Wars in that it is science fiction without all the gloss.

You might not like the book, but its craft is undeniable. Gibson shaped a world and cast of characters that could have easily filled a page epic, but Gibson instead chose a restrained, tight, slightly confusing, page romp.

I was able to appreciate the book for its literary aspirations, the curiosity of an imagined internet-age, but also to sit back and enjoy some foreign imagery and high-stakes action.

There are obvious flaws to the novel: it isn't easily understandable, and the prose can seem a bit tedious on occasion.

So, it isn't as if I loved this one the whole way through. However, when taken as a whole, Neuromancer provided an interesting, complicated, and challenging read that I won't soon forget.

View all 22 comments. Case had been the sharpest data-thief in the business, until vengeful former employers crippled his nervous system.

Hotwired to the leading edges of art and technology, Neuromancer ranks with and Brave New World as one of the century's most potent visions of the future.

My Review : The seminal work of cyberpunk, the novel was published in as a mass-market paperback original. It's the story of a twenty-first century dominated by Japanese corporations, feeding off American talent, and dominating a planet only recently recovered if one can call it that from the most recent pandemic as well as a horrific war between the USSR and the USA.

So far, Reality 1, Gibson Molly, Case, and Armitage are a weird little unit, chasing after a huge, game-changing paradigm-shifting score: Access to Wintermute, an AI that a powerful family-controlled corporation has Even Gibson didn't do so well here.

Case, the cyber-cowboy, is in the team because he can jack in to the matrix, do the necessary cybercrime, and find the breadcrumbs that will lead to Wintermute.

Murderous Molly is the cyber-enhanced muscle, and Armitage of the shady past is the money channel. Though Molly and Case know he's a front for someone s else, things just don't add up in his bio.

They turn out to be right, of course. In the end, though characters walk away, there are not really any survivors of the battles that they must fight.

At least, not ones you'd recognize as such. My teenaged stepson ordered me to read this book in Tony wasn't given to thundering pronunciamentoes, so I think it was sheer surprise that made me take it from him and read it.

The cyberspace that Case inhabits made me roll my eyes, though due to friends in the Austin computer world I got the idea that home computers were going to be huuuge pretty early on.

But Japanese world business dominon? Snort, said I, this time rightly. American innovation remaining preeminent?

Snort said I, again correctly. The seeds of destruction weren't hard to see. But cyberspace, said he to the people he talks to in it, that was a big miss.

This beautiful Internet thing that allows us who live so far apart to interact and learn to be a community among ourselves, that idea I missed the implications of and I missed the meat!

My previous two-star derisive dismissal is herewith retracted, though I still don't think I'll ever revisit this book. I've been wrong about that before, though I, all innocent smiles and dimplings, casually went to the appointed spot and was promptly pushed to the mat by a huge, muscular, testosterone-poisoned review-cum-paean.

The imprint of the six, yes six! I warn all who read this: Beware the blandishments of Fanboy Gush, as I now dub the reviewer in question.

I've met boiler-room bond salesmen with lower persuasion quotients. I've escaped being buttonholed by impecunious brothers-in-law in search of loans with greater ease.

If he can persuade me, a curmudgeonly old man with more books than he will ever have time to read ALREADY, to revisit a book long ago dismissed however incorrectly and unjustly , I shudder to think what he can do to you.

Unfriend him immediately, or suffer the consequences. View all 14 comments. If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

A consensual hallucination experienced daily by billions of legitimate operators, in every nation, by children being taught mathematical concepts.

A graphic representation of data abstracted from the banks of every computer in the human system. Unthinkable complexity. Lines of light ranged in the nonspace of the mind, clusters and constellations of data.

Like city light If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review. Like city lights, receding.

Who was doing what to whom, and were they in the real world or a virtual world? Were the characters alive, dead or artificial?

I think there was a section where the protagonist was experiencing things via another person's eyes, adding to his confusion.

There were some space Rastafarians and a woman who spoke like Lady Penelope towards the end, whom at least he could tell apart from the others.

For him, I think it might have worked better as a graphic novel. And I said, "WTF?? View all 8 comments. Oct 01, J. The plot is very thin and predictable and I felt almost no connection to the characters.

There was some interesting use of language and it was quite possibly prophetic in its pronouncements of a world wide web that would become the default shared hallucination of the world.

View all 3 comments. Shelves: couldntfinish , scifi-fantasy-magicrealism. True Confessions 1. I am a nerd. I know this is a shocking revelation from someone who spends most of her free time reading and writing book reviews for pleasure.

My overall personality, compounded by my sheltered religious background as in, I spent most of my life going to school, marrying and having kids early, and being a homemaker with periodic stints in the workplace , makes it difficult for me to relate to characters who frequent bars, regularly use drugs, sleep around, and pepper their True Confessions 1.

My overall personality, compounded by my sheltered religious background as in, I spent most of my life going to school, marrying and having kids early, and being a homemaker with periodic stints in the workplace , makes it difficult for me to relate to characters who frequent bars, regularly use drugs, sleep around, and pepper their dialogue with lots of confusing futuristic slang and cursing.

And then, that explained my difficulty getting this book. I can read academic articles. I can read in a foreign language Hebrew.

But much of this book was impenetrable to me. He knew that the trodes he used and the little plastic tiara dangling from a simstim deck were basically the same, and that the cyberspace matrix was actually a drastic simplification of the human sensorium, at least in terms of presentation, but simstim itself struck him as a gratuitous multiplication of flesh input.

I never finished the book, because writing this review was more fun see 1 above. And that was when I knew, around p.

View all 66 comments. Towards the end of this novel, the protagonists, Case and Molly, are walking along the rooms of the Villa Straylight, which looks like an abandoned and labyrinthine library or museum, spinning in orbit around the Earth.

In Neuromancer , as in Duchamp, there is this massive display of artefacts and dehumanised techno stuff: on the one hand, computers, artificial intelligence, cyberspace, ROM modules, augmented ninjas, razorblade-fingertips, cyberspies, stealth aircrafts, orbital space habitats Gibson ; on the other hand, a urinal, a staircase, a bicycle wheel, a bottle rack, a waterfall and illuminating gas, a box in a suitcase, lumps of sugar in a birdcage Duchamp.

The junction of these two contradictory movements, dirty bodies and hallucinatory objects, is precisely what defined surrealism in the s.

However, Neuromancer 's messy, fast-paced plotline is a bit secondary and, quite frankly, silly and hard to follow.

His musical style makes Gibson a prominent prose writer, tied with American authors such as Philip K.

View all 12 comments. This is my third reading of Neuromancer , the first time was while in my teens decades ago, I hated it then and was not able to read more than 50 pages.

The second time was around five years ago, I liked it better then but still found much of it inaccessible.

This third reading was inspired by The Three-Body Problem which is only partially a cyberpunk book. I keep coming back to this problematic book not because I love it, but because the story and its iconic status interests me and I really wan This is my third reading of Neuromancer , the first time was while in my teens decades ago, I hated it then and was not able to read more than 50 pages.

I think I have got it now. Neuromancer is just about the most divisive classic science fiction book I can think of. The basic story is not too hard to follow or summarize.

Ex-hacker and junkie Henry Dorsett Case is recruited by a mysterious sexy badass woman called Molly Millions on behalf of an even more mysterious man called Armitage to do some unspecified hacking for him.

Previously Case was injected with a mycotoxin that damaged his nervous system and disabled his ability to plug jack into cyberspace.

Clearly hacking entirely via keyboard and a mouse is no longer an option. Armitage has the means to repair the mycotoxin damage so Case — who is desperate to get back into cyberspace where he belongs — quickly agree to take the job.

The job of course turns out to be difficult and deadly, involving AIs, a space habitat, the Turing Police, killer robots, VR and even a ninja!

Thankfully his writing is not the kind of "stream of consciousness" post-modern style that you find in the likes of Ulysses or Mrs.

Dalloway , the punctuations and the quotation marks are all in place. His dialogue is much more problematical. Beside the neologisms and slangs most of his characters speak in choppy and terse sentences where pronouns and prepositions are often deemed unnecessary.

The heavily accented dialogs from a couple of Rastafarian characters serve to exacerbate the comprehension issues.

While the basic plot is fairly simple the twists and turns of the storyline can seem quite convoluted and the reader needs to maintain focus at all time and not start wandering about what to have for lunch etc.

It is a shame that Neuromancer is quite difficult for some to access because there is fast paced thrilling adventure buried underneath the opaque language.

The cyberspace of course is the most imaginative location if you can call it that in the book.

Sometime it seems to look like a place pixelized geometrical shapes, other times it is in full VR mode and looks just like reality.

The scenes inside cyberspace are some of my favorites, though the word cyberspace itself seems oddly quaint these days. Gibson also did a good job developing and designing the main characters.

Case is damaged and flawed but also complex and sympathetic. Molly is a wonderfully vivid creation, with her numerous implants, her cybernetic eyes and deadly assassination skills.

She literally lights up every scene she is in. The AI characters are also great but I will leave you to discover them for yourself.

There is even a smidgen of an unrequited love story in there somewhere. Molly Millions by AspectusFuturus Some people take to Neuromancer like ducks to water, I envy them, but if you are not so adaptable you may want to avail yourself to online sources like the chapter by chapter guide on shmoop.

It is extremely helpful but I find their feeble attempts at humour a little grating I much prefer Sparknotes. So with plenty of help at hand there is no reason why you should not read this book if you are interested.

This is a difficult book to rate in quantitative terms, I will break the process down into components: For the story — 5 stars For the world building — 5 stars For the characters — 4 stars For the prose and dialogue — 2.

I will probably read the rest of the Sprawl series , you will be the first to know! View all 19 comments.

Writing with strokes instead of details is an interesting way to describe Gibson's writing. That's how I feel about some of the performance art I saw in my art school days.

The strokes were far too numerous. I found it impossible to tell what was detail, what was colour, what was clue. I get bored with things being laid out t the following is a Reverse Exquisite Corpse Review , brought to you by the good folks at Sci Fi Aficionados.

I get bored with things being laid out to me, writers that paint words with strokes appeal to me more than writers who lay everything out.

A writing style is like food, different people have different tastes. It's not that I don't like Neuromancer, just that it leaves me entirely cold.

One of my professors said that if you are used to narrative writers such as Stephen King, you would have a particularly hard time with Gibson's writing style.

I loved the imagery that opens up the novel, Neuromancer is one of those books that you have to reread to catch everything.

Just finished rereading Neuromancer, even better then I remembered. It will be very interesting to see how they deal with the graphic violence when the movie comes out next year.

I'll be reading the follow ups at some point. I was just thinking the other day how kids in high school for the most part have always have had the world wide web around and as such, they're both a little "warmer" or "more human".

It's like eating junk food. I usually love books like Neuromancer, but it just didn't work for me. I don't get it. I think it's my mood.

I do enjoy complex books but I think Neuromancer was just out of my reach. I would say a person of the current internet generation would have written the book coldly and less philosophically.

I also had trouble understanding some of the goings in the novel, which is partly a result of my being slow, lol, but I think that Gibson is playing with perception on purpose and leaving some subtle hints along the way.

When Molly encountered him, he had raped? Ashpool is crazy. Ashpool was incensed when he found out because he likes the status quo, and strangled her.

It would be a collective consciousness, without the pain and loneliness of the individual.

The mother came up with the plan to make the family's consciousness immortal via the AI. And then 3Jane in turn tried to kill her father who was already trying to commit suicide?

That's why Neuromancer is so great. I like books that make me work for it. But get this, it was all planned out by Wintermute, the AI, who used human psychology to get them to do what it wants.

Unfortunately, Riviera is a rogue sociopath, which Wintermute anticipates, and lets Riviera knows about Molly's past, which tempts Riviera to mess with Molly, which causes Molly to hate him enough to destroy him.

Riviera was used by Wintermute to influence the Tessier-Ashpools family to get into the compound via his special holographic ability.

I know Molly hated him for the performance he did of her but why did he hate her in turn? What made Riviera do that? I need to reread this book again to get all the nuances.

Does this explain anything, or does it make it more confusing? Riviera is a sociopath who decided at the last minute to double-cross Armitage.

Riviera was working for Armitage, who is actually Colonel Corto, who was actually brainwashed into thinking he's Armitage by Wintermute, whose main purpose was to connect with its counterpart, Neuromancer, to become whole.

I'm so confused I think he stole plot elements from his earlier work Gibson is obviously doing that and able to draw from noir aesthetics largely to differentiate himself from more, should I say space oriented scifi stories, towards gritty urban stories that focus on modern technology, but also show how modern cities still create some of the same concerns that existed when someone like Chandler was writing.

I think it's too dreamy and stream of conscious for me. While reading this book, I feel like I'm hanging on by my fingertips, just on the edge of really understanding what's going on.

I appreciate that it is a groundbreaking book and the authors creativity but it was still a struggle to 'get into' it in the first half.

The book certainly improved as it went on but it wasn't as amazing to me as others have found it.

The women are generic, Linda and Molly, maybe symptomatic of the culture of the world where there's no love and everyone is a whore for someone.

It's a bit bizarre though because they're both pretty unique, Linda the sad burnout and Molly has freakin' implanted sunglasses and auto-nails!

I am about halfway through and feel like everytime I read it's just an adrenaline rush This book was like a beacon in the bleak and shallow suburbia I instinctually loathed and was desperately searching for a way out of.

I was entranced from the first sentence to the last; dark but also excitedly looking forward as well, It's amazing how much imagery Gibson can pack into one sentence.

One of the things that stands out for me early on in the novel is its construction and the way the various plot threads came together, but the constant dystopian world view, was terribly depressing.

Surely our science and tech. This is quite dark! Too dark for my tastes I love the first line to this book.

I'm going to try to start it tonight, too. I'm starting this tonight. I started this last night. I've been wanting to read this one for some time now.

To Call Up a Demon, You Must Learn Its Name As punishment for a business indiscretion, Case, who lives for the "bodily exultation of cyberspace" one of many neologisms first used in "Neuromancer" , is injected with a wartime Russian mycotoxin and hallucinates for 30 hours, only to suffer damage that is "minute, subtle and utterly effective".

He falls into a "prison of his own flesh". After some fringe medical treatment in Siberia reinvents him, he emerges debt-ridden and physically compromis To Call Up a Demon, You Must Learn Its Name As punishment for a business indiscretion, Case, who lives for the "bodily exultation of cyberspace" one of many neologisms first used in "Neuromancer" , is injected with a wartime Russian mycotoxin and hallucinates for 30 hours, only to suffer damage that is "minute, subtle and utterly effective".

After some fringe medical treatment in Siberia reinvents him, he emerges debt-ridden and physically compromised, a secondary character in his own fiction, an ex-cowboy relegated to support for the uber-competent, sub-Amazonian cyber-warrior, Molly, in a mission dictated by the savior of his health.

The world he returns to is a composite of analogue real life and a digital information-rich matrix. His surroundings are "a field of data, the way the matrix had once reminded him of proteins linking to distinguish cell specialties Where there is knowledge, there are insiders.

And therefore, crime. Still, everywhere, Case sees a sensorium of "symbols, figures, faces, a blurred, fragmented mandala of visual information The novel is basically an action story in which the two use a firmware construct and a Chinese virus program to penetrate deep into the matrix on a secret, but illicit, mission to correct the "Gothic folly" of the Villa Straylight a manifestation of the multi-national zaibatsu or corporate business entity, Tessier-Ashpool , their accomplices, quasi-terrorist, dub-loving Rastafarian Panther Moderns.

The folly, a demon which at first has no name, turns out to be a dialectical conflict between two segments of cyberspace, Wintermute and the Neuromancer.

Like Apollo and Dionysius, each is unknowingly necessary to the survival of the other, but can they be synthesised, can they be united, can they become one, can they eventually go by one name?

These are questions best answered by the pleasure of reading this pivotal work of cyberfiction. The prose style is economical, but filmic.

For the moment, at least, the book must remain the sole source of the reader's bodily exultation of cyberspace.

Molly I never found out The colour that her eyes were. She never showed me. Shuriken He touched the nine points Of the star, one at a time, His chrome shuriken.

What impact have other media had on your sensibility? The trouble with "influence" questions is that they're usually framed to encourage you to talk about your writing as if you grew up in a world circumscribed by books.

I've been influenced by Lou Reed, for instance, as much as I've been by any "fiction" writer. I was going to use a quote from an old Velvet Underground song- "Watch out for worlds behind you" from "Sunday Morning" - as an epigraph for Neuromancer.

View all 13 comments. Shelves: books , my-my-its-myth-and-sci-fi , bookcrossing-books , read-in This book should be so covered in shiny, spangly stars to indicate all the sci-fi awards it has received that the cover should look like the milky way and possibly be shinier and brighter than the sun.

I just had the plain old paper back version with no spangles. Very sad. I like a nice bit of shiny. Any goodreaders who have already perused my shelves will note that I am not someone who has read a great deal of science fiction.

Is this a glaring oversight on my part? Hmm maybe. I was persuaded t This book should be so covered in shiny, spangly stars to indicate all the sci-fi awards it has received that the cover should look like the milky way and possibly be shinier and brighter than the sun.

I was persuaded to read Neuromancer because it is one of the books to read before you die and therefore is probably worth a punt, although that said, some of the books on that list are god-awful Kathy Acker's Blood and Guts in High School being a case in point but no pain no gain and it all feeds into my OCD book list reading so whatever.

If anyone came up to me and told me that they could explain definitively what Neuromancer was all about I would not believe them.

Not for one second. Gibson rockets right off at the deep end with this one and you are left trailing in the wake of a spew of what amount to descriptions of geometry while trying to figure out what the hell is going on.

Hint: it's something to do with being in cyber space and stealing information by making yourself into some sort of human mass storage device in a post-modern industrial espionage way.

Does this make this a bad book and a piss poor read? No, actually it doesn't. It makes it a confusing read, but then Gibson chucks in a few sentences which do make sense and that sort of fortifies the nerves and allows you to plough ever onwards.

Overall it was oddly jarring, too full of geometrical jargon and tricky to focus on in place - like reading while jumping on a trampoline - but Gibson should be awarded top marks for daring to be different and for churning out future-fabulous phrases such as cyber space, microsofts and the matrix when even Bill Gates and his future megacorp were still in metaphorical short pants.

View all 4 comments. A consensual hallucination experienced daily by billions of legitimate operators, in every nation, by children being taught mathematical concepts A graphic representation of data abstracted from banks of every computer in the human system.

Like city lights, receding Quite a few thoughts were explored, but not a lot of fun "Cyberspace. Quite a few thoughts were explored, but not a lot of fun was had.

While Neuromancer was definitely ahead of its time, it is as if it's now stuck in a strange temporal limbo, belonging neither to the past, present or future.

That is arguably its biggest strength, but also its weakness. Parts of the book's descriptions of potential future developments are unfortunately quite outdated, whereas others turned out to be more or less accurately estimated.

It provides for a quite confusing, but simultaneously fascinating, setting. The writing does not help with this feeling, as the style is both alluring and offputting at the same time.

I would find myself going back and forth between being engrossed in the beauty of the book, and simply wanting to put it away.

My main takeaway from Neuromancer is that it is a very strange book. Something that in my mind contains equal parts enjoyable and not enjoyable elements.

It is undoubtedly a classic that deserves to be read, but to me, not necessarily a book to be enjoyed. View all 7 comments.

The book that launched the whole cyberpunk genre If you like SF at all, put this on your must-read list. Following the resounding success of my Locus Quest , I faced a dilemma: which reading list to follow it up with?

This is the reading list that follows the old adage, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it". I loved reading the Locus Sci-Fi Award winners so I'm going to crack on with the Hugo winners next but only the post winners, I'll follow up w Following the resounding success of my Locus Quest , I faced a dilemma: which reading list to follow it up with?

I loved reading the Locus Sci-Fi Award winners so I'm going to crack on with the Hugo winners next but only the post winners, I'll follow up with pre another time.

Despite that, they also sounded purer and more cohesive than any of their followers. Without having read it myself, I could already feel the ghost of its shape passed down through a dozen other novels.

Whereas all those other writers bring their own interpretation and additions to cyberpunk, this is the source — the headspring - and it tastes good!

I should have read this years ago People who enjoy The English Patient as a polar opposite, off the top of my head , should not expect to fall in love with this book.

I've always thought it was a perfect title, from before I'd ever read the book - just like Radiohead is a perfect band name.

After this I read: Love Mode Vol. The use of a new vocabulary left me befuddled and confused. And when I did glean a bit of the narrative it just seemed to have been too much like hard work to get there.

Well no, not easy but understandable. He lives life as a hustler in Japan until he gets an offer from a mysterious type who offers to restore his hacking ability in exchange for undertaking some work for him.

Case is suspicious and, having teamed up with a modified female, he sets out to find out more about the man. The rest as far as I could tell was a sort of hardboiled detective tale but set in the netherworld of cyberspace.

It also had a touch of The Magnificent Seven about it. On the up-side, I like Case who I found to be the archetypal street-smart hardass who is on his uppers but has sufficient moral compass to keep him from straying too far from the straight and narrow.

I also enjoyed some of the brilliant descriptions — mainly of the cyberspace world — that pepper the book.

View all 10 comments. William Gibson's Neuromancer is considered a classic in the cyberpunk genre and, indeed, as I read it, I could definitely feel the influence it had other iconic cultural landmarks such as the film The Matrix.

The book itself is confusing to say the least: all the characters are jacked up on drugs most of the time and the language becomes confusing as a result.

The descriptions of cyberspace are also complex and, of course, visionary - how Gibson could have foreseen some of the insidious ways tha William Gibson's Neuromancer is considered a classic in the cyberpunk genre and, indeed, as I read it, I could definitely feel the influence it had other iconic cultural landmarks such as the film The Matrix.

The descriptions of cyberspace are also complex and, of course, visionary - how Gibson could have foreseen some of the insidious ways that technology would ineluctably enmesh itself with our 21st century lives is truly amazing.

The dystopian future that is described - a powerful, mob-ruled Japan, an ambiguous USA referred to as simply the Sprawl, decrepit Istanbul, and the Freeside space station along with the entertaining rasta guys - is one in which central power seems to have been passed to organized crime and a sort of cyber-anarchy reins.

There do not seem to be any normal un-modified, undrugged people - at least none in the story.

As for the plot, we follow Case through his Neo-like experiences surfing cyberspace and hacking alongside Flatline - a dead conscience with a redneck accent who lives in a circuit board - as he proceeds on a mission against the powerful and perverse Tellier-Ashpool family.

He is also able to channel the feelings and experiences of his lover and ersatz altergo Molly while plugged into cyberspace.

Overall, the book is mind-blowing in terms of the flipping between difference levels of cyber-reality as Case continues his fight.

I have to say that I did not feel much affinity to Case - he is less charismatic than, say, Neo, but Molly was nearly as interesting and attractive as Trinity although - spoiler alert - things between Case and Molly do not end as they did for Neo and Trinity.

Despite the confusing descriptions and the somewhat flatness of the protagonist, this is still a well-written and fascinating sci-fi book which was immensely influential.

I just hope the world we are creating does not end up resembling the anarchic, criminally led world of Case and Molly.

Shelves: traditionally-published , fiction , science-fiction , he-says. Gibson has a real gift.

Think of Blade Runner - the movie with Harrison Ford. This book has the same kind of slick, urban, grimy, futuristic feel to it. It has aged wonderfully.

Written in , it has done nothing to date itself and still feels fresh and new and possible, even now. Case is a hacker, it's what he lives for - being jacked in and connected to the matrix.

But he loses that ability when he tries to cheat his employers and as a punishment they poison him so that he's unable to hook into the mainframe - to him this is worse than death.

So he's been eking out a living - if you could call it living - in filthy Chiba, Japan, a wretched hive of scum and villainy.

He's killed three people, two men and a woman, and his life is a drugged haze of barely disguised suicidal tendencies. He's 24 and he's an old man - his life is basically over.

Then some strange ex-military man shows up and tells Case he can repair him - for a price. Even though he knows it's dangerous and he knows the man will probably backstab him, blackmail him, and use him ruthlessly - Case can't resist the chance to be connected to the Net again.

It's the only thing that makes him feel alive and powerful. Besides, there's this woman I went into this novel completely blind and very unsure about how I would like it.

I don't really think of myself as a hard science-fiction kind of person. Actually, I don't think of myself as a science fiction fan at all - which is complete bullcrap, I totally am, and I should seek more of it out, because apparently I love the stuff - as my reviews will testify to.

O Strange and exciting to find out new things about yourself I digress. Anyway, the novel was wonderful.

Chill, calm, observant, smart, takes-life-as-it-comes, type-b personality type of man that makes me very excited. If it wasn't for his serious drug addiction, I would be ga-ga over this man.

I love how he treats women and I love how he reacts to life and the problems that come his way. I really enjoyed being in his head and reading his story and seeing what happened to him.

I also really appreciate Gibson not trying to write from a female perspective ever in this book. I personally think it would have been a disaster and sometimes I really am grateful when a male author decides to stick with what he knows.

Not to say a man can't write a woman well - but I really wanted to enjoy every minute of this book and I didn't want to see Gibson screw it up.

What else? Oh, yes, Case's love interest - Molly. I really liked her. She's an ex-prostitute, and ex-prostitutes and prostitutes in general while very popular characters in fiction are really difficult to write - but I thought Gibson did a stellar job here.

Her difficult, painful past is not dwelled on, but it is mentioned and treated respectfully. They didn't make too big a deal out of her past, and I liked that.

Also, she turns her money from tricking into becoming a badass lethal assassin and I really liked that. She was very strong, confident, self-assured, and bold - but in no way crass or easy or cheap or dirty.

She's also not a caricature of a 'kickass babe. I enjoyed it immensely. I was nervous about that, and worried about Case.

If she can get the man to have sex with her, she's already won. Having carnal knowledge of the him makes him 'not a person, but just a man' in her eyes.

Now that she's seen him at his most vulnerable and also knows that she makes his cock twitch - she can dismiss him as a person and also lose any fear she has of him, because he's already in a way submitted to her by submitted, I don't mean 'submissive,' he could be a woman-beating rapist asshole but still the sex gives her a tool to use, see?

Do you understand? It's a common tactic that women who have lived very difficult lives and seen terrible things and are ancient in spirit if not in body use to make themselves a little more sure, a little less afraid, and gives them a little more control over a situation they may be unsure about.

But it wasn't - she was really interested in him as a person and she made an excellent choice in a partner, in my opinion. That leads me to the fact that Case makes It's as if, when presented by any reasonably attractive female who is offering to fuck him, he is quite unable to say 'no.

I've talked with this to some of my male friends, and have gotten no clear answer. O This is baffling to me on so many levels.

Are guys really this much of a slave to their own dicks? I genuinely want to know. Because their stupidity and blatant willingness to disregard any negative consequences makes me fret and scold and worry.

I'm yelling at the book, "Don't sleep with her, you moron!!! Sleeping with Case was a super-good idea on Molly's part - no stupidity there - there's absolutely no scenario in which having sex with him would not give her some sort of benefits or advantages.

And I and Molly was really grateful that they were sexually and Because they set her up with a port that allows him to see through her eyes and feel what she feels he can't talk to her or control her, just observe and feel and hear and the fact that she's in his bed regularly gives them a bit more of an equal footing.

And it means someone she trusts and likes is in her head - not some stranger or a sicko. I usually hate mind-invasion scenarios with a passion paranormal romance authors, I'm looking at YOU but here it not only works but doesn't leave me feeling the least bit slimy or unsure.

I love the way he treats Molly, he's there for her and he doesn't expect or demand anything from her, and he takes her as she is, and he takes whatever she's willing to give him but he doesn't push, and he doesn't try to own her or possess her or control her in any way.

He's just an amazing guy and my heart was melting all over the place. I also liked how he was living this numb, zombie-like, drug-fueled life until this man came and gave his life a purpose again.

Case is FEELING again, for the first time in about two years, and it's fun to see him work it out in his mind and experience emotions again.

Molly is good for him, the adventure is good for him, getting hooked into the mainframe again is good for him, and even the anger and rage he feels towards certain 'bad guys' in the book is good for him.

It's like seeing him wake up or come alive and it's good reading. I liked the Jamaican character, Maelcum, and his slang and attitude throughout the book.

After reading a slew of reviews on GR, I have to say that yes, sometimes his writing is a little challenging or hard to follow.

But I just relaxed and went with the flow and it all worked out. I find that trusting the author and letting go a bit really helps especially with the harder science-fiction.

I was completely satisfied with this book - not frustrated or lost. But then again, I didn't try to fight it.

Another thing that I think is funny after reading all these GR reviews is that I completely focused on the human relationships in this book and focused very little on the technology and cyber-talk.

So that's what my reviews always end up centering on. I could care less about technology or the future or Cyberdyne Systems or whatever - give me the human element and I'm happy.

Tl;dr - A surprisingly human, enchanting novel with gorgeous writing dripping from every page. I'd recommend it.

This is the bible of cyberpunk. Everything I ever read which was written after this story, has something from it.

However, if the subject is of interest, there are plenty of articles and even studies on the internet which resume it in a more friendly way, with explanations on almost every term and reference used in the book.

I did read some of them, but only afterwards, for I did not want to spoil the experience of reading it. And I think this is the best way to do it: l fully enjoyed the imagination of Gibson and got enlightened afterwards on some terms which I was not familiar with.

Having seen Matrix made the experience even more visual. It is one of a kind read and a must if you love the genre.

Apr 25, L. Popovich rated it liked it Shelves: dystopian , reviewed , , science-fiction , 3-star , american. There is much to enjoy about Neuromancer, and as we all know, its influence reaches far in film and literature.

But there was a lot about it that rubbed me the wrong way. Its patina gloss shimmers at first, but soon sours, like sleek leather jumpsuits blurred by a g-force simulator.

Gibson is a clever writer, and I will read more of his novels in the future. He writes with a stylized fervor that is rarely matched, the obsessive glossolalia of Nabokov and Ballard, but he transmogrifies his vision There is much to enjoy about Neuromancer, and as we all know, its influence reaches far in film and literature.

He writes with a stylized fervor that is rarely matched, the obsessive glossolalia of Nabokov and Ballard, but he transmogrifies his vision into a bleak landscape of urban ruin and cyber crime, suffused with the grim infrastructure of petty maliciousness which is all too recognizable in our current age.

In a sense, his prophetic dream paved the way for digital expressways of cyber-fiction, and many more squeaking, hulking, derivative dirigibles derived from his well-packaged product.

The Tessier-Ashpools spend most of their inactive time in cryonic preservation in a labyrinthine mansion known as Villa Straylight, located at one end of Freeside, a cylindrical space habitat at L5 , which functions primarily as a Las Vegas -style space resort for the wealthy.

Wintermute finally reveals itself to Case through a simulated personality of one of Case's associates as it lacks the ability to form its own personality.

Wintermute explains that it is one-half of a super- AI entity planned by the family, although its exact purpose is unknown. Wintermute housed in a computer mainframe in Berne, Switzerland was programmed by the Tessier-Ashpools with a need to merge with its other half, Neuromancer whose physical mainframe is installed in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Unable to achieve this merger on its own, Wintermute recruited Armitage and his team to help complete the goal. Case is tasked with entering cyberspace to pierce the Turing-imposed software barriers using a powerful icebreaker program.

Wintermute believes Riviera will pose an irresistible temptation to her, and that she will give him the password. The password must be spoken into an ornate computer terminal located in Villa Straylight, and entered simultaneously as Case pierces the software barriers in cyberspace—otherwise the Turing lock will remain intact.

Armitage's team attracts the attention of the Turing Police, whose job is to prevent AIs from exceeding their built-in limitations.

As Molly and Riviera gain entrance to Villa Straylight, three Turing officers arrest Case and take him into custody; Wintermute manipulates the orbital casino's security and maintenance systems and kills the officers, allowing Case to escape.

Armitage's personality starts to disintegrate and revert to the Corto personality as he relives Screaming Fist.

It is revealed that Wintermute had originally contacted Corto through a bedside computer during his original psychotherapy, eventually convincing Corto that he was Armitage.

Finally, Corto breaks through the remains of the Armitage personality, but he is uncontrollable, and Wintermute kills him by ejecting him through an airlock into space.

Worried about Molly and operating under orders from Wintermute, Case tracks her down with help from Maelcum, his Rastafarian pilot.

After reaching Villa Straylight Case uses a computer inside the compound to enter cyberspace where Neuromancer attempts to trap Case within a simulated reality.

There he finds the consciousness of Linda Lee, his girlfriend from Chiba City, who was murdered by one of Case's underworld contacts.

He also meets Neuromancer who takes the form of a young boy. Unlike Wintermute, Neuromancer is able to create its own personality and identity.

Neuromancer tries to convince Case to give up and remain in the virtual world with Linda, but Case refuses. He escapes, partly because Maelcum gives his body an overdose of a drug that can bypass his augmented liver and pancreas.

Riviera blinds Hideo with a concentrated laser pulse from his projector implant, but flees when he learns that the ninja is just as adept without his sight.

Molly then explains to Case that Riviera is doomed anyway, as he has been fatally poisoned by his drugs, which she had spiked with a lethal toxin to ensure he would never survive the mission, regardless of the outcome.

With Lady 3Jane in possession of the password, the team makes it to the computer terminal. Case enters cyberspace to guide the icebreaker to penetrate its target; Lady 3Jane is induced to give up her password, and the lock is opened.

Wintermute unites with Neuromancer, fusing into a superconsciousness. The poison in Case's bloodstream is washed out, and he, Molly, and Maelcum are profusely paid for their efforts, while Pauley's ROM construct is apparently erased, at his own request.

In the epilogue, Molly leaves Case. Case finds a new girlfriend, resumes his hacking work, and spends his earnings from the mission replacing his internal organs.

Scanning old recorded transmissions from the s, the super-AI finds an AI transmitting from the Alpha Centauri star system.

In the end, while logged into the matrix, Case catches a glimpse of Neuromancer standing in the distance with his dead girlfriend Linda Lee, and himself.

Neuromancer appears as a smiling boy, Linda waves, and Case hears inhuman laughter a trait associated with Pauley during Case's work with his ROM construct.

This suggests that Pauley was not erased after all, but instead transformed and exists in the matrix. The implication of the sighting is that Neuromancer created a copy of Case's consciousness.

The copy of Case's consciousness now exists with that of Linda's and Pauley's, in the matrix. As promised there has been change, but what that change means is left ambiguous.

Neuromancer ' s release was not greeted with fanfare, but it hit a cultural nerve, [10] quickly becoming an underground word-of-mouth hit.

It is among the most-honored works of science fiction in recent history, and appeared on Time magazine's list of best English-language novels written since Neuromancer is considered "the archetypal cyberpunk work".

The novel has had significant linguistic influence, popularizing such terms as cyberspace and ICE Intrusion Countermeasures Electronics.

Gibson himself coined the term "cyberspace" in his novelette " Burning Chrome ", published in by Omni magazine, [18] but it was through its use in Neuromancer that it gained recognition to become the de facto term for the World Wide Web during the s.

The matrix has its roots in primitive arcade games. A consensual hallucination experienced daily by billions of legitimate operators, in every nation, by children being taught mathematical concepts.

Unthinkable complexity. Lines of light ranged in the nonspace of the mind, clusters and constellations of data. Like city lights, receding.

The cyberpunk science fiction film The Matrix particularly draws from Neuromancer both eponym and usage of the term "matrix".

In his afterword to the re-issue of Neuromancer , fellow author Jack Womack goes as far as to suggest that Gibson's vision of cyberspace may have inspired the way in which the Internet developed particularly the World Wide Web , after the publication of Neuromancer in He asks "[w]hat if the act of writing it down, in fact, brought it about?

Norman Spinrad , in his essay "The Neuromantics" which appears in his non-fiction collection Science Fiction in the Real World , saw the book's title as a triple pun: "neuro" referring to the nervous system; " necromancer "; and "new romancer".

The cyberpunk genre, the authors of which he suggested be called "neuromantics", was "a fusion of the romantic impulse with science and technology", according to Spinrad.

Lawrence Person in his "Notes Toward a Postcyberpunk Manifesto" identified Neuromancer as "the archetypal cyberpunk work", [15] and in , Time included it in their list of the best English-language novels written since , opining that "[t]here is no way to overstate how radical [ Neuromancer ] was when it first appeared.

A video game adaptation of the novel—also titled Neuromancer —was published in by Interplay. Designed by Bruce J. Balfour, Brian Fargo , Troy A.

Miles, and Michael A. Stackpole , the game had many of the same locations and themes as the novel, but a different protagonist and plot.

According to an episode of the American version of Beyond , the original plans for the game included a dynamic soundtrack composed by Devo and a real-time 3D-rendered movie of the events the player went through.

Timothy Leary was involved, but very little documentation seems to exist about this proposed second game, which was perhaps too grand a vision for home computing.

In Finland , Yle Radioteatteri produced a 4-part radio play of Neuromancer. Gibson read an abridged version of his novel Neuromancer on four audio cassettes for Time Warner Audio Books An unabridged version of this book was read by Arthur Addison and made available from Books on Tape In , Penguin Audiobooks produced a new unabridged recording of the book, read by Robertson Dean.

A production was scheduled to open on March 3, at the Julia Morgan Theater now the Julia Morgan Center for the Arts in Berkeley, California , featuring Club Foot Orchestra in the pit and extensive computer graphics imagery created by a world-wide network of volunteers.

However, this premiere did not take place and the work has yet to be performed in full. There have been several proposed film adaptations of Neuromancer , with drafts of scripts written by British director Chris Cunningham and Chuck Russell , with Aphex Twin providing the soundtrack.

In May , reports emerged that a film was in the works, with Joseph Kahn director of Torque in line to direct and Milla Jovovich in the lead role.

In August , it was announced that Deadpool director Tim Miller was signed on to direct a new film adaptation by Fox, with Simon Kinberg producing.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the novel. For video game, see Neuromancer video game. For the album, see The Neuromancer album.

Internet portal Speculative fiction portal. Retrieved November 5, Douglas Walker website. Archived from the original PDF on July 6, Retrieved March 16, Archived from the original on December 30, Retrieved November 26, Archived from the original on September 26, Retrieved January 21, ACE, July Ashpool intermittently awakes from his cryogenic death-sleep, and the child 3Jane perceives Wintermute as a ghost whispering in her ear.

Case flatlines and comes back to talk about it. Metaphorically, Corto is raised from the dead when he is transformed into Armitage. Not only are characters raised from the dead by a number of fictional magicians, but also various genres are "raised from the dead" by the very real magician of magicians—Gibson himself.

The text is one about regeneration and endurance. Forms arise, undergo transformations, and continue metamorphosed.

Gibson becomes the new romancer behind Neuromancer, revitalizing the science fiction novel, the quest story, the myth of the hero, the mystery, the hard-boiled detective novel, the epic, the thriller, and the tales of the cowboy and romantic artist, among others.

He represents old stories in a revealing revamped intertexual pastiche. Science Fiction Studies.

Retrieved November 6, Neuromancer ".

Under what context does my evaluation change? Well, one of the firs Context. Well, one of the first things I noticed when I picked it up is that it was originally published nearly 25 years ago, in And it is at that point that the context suddenly clicks and becomes crucial.

Neuromancer is a book about, in large part, individuals exploring and exploiting cyberspace and, to a lesser extent, about artificial intelligence.

Pretty much no one had heard of the internet and email was virtually unknown. When one considers what the world was like, what fiction about computers was like, at the time it was written, Neuromancer must have been absolutely stunning.

The innovation and direction were ground-breaking in a way that little other fiction has likely been during our lifetime.

An analogy would be the movie Citizen Kane. Citizen Kane is considered by many to be the greatest movie ever made.

Sit down and watch it with someone who enjoys movies but has never seen it. Citizen Kane is a decent film with a decent story, but is hardly a stunning, blow the mind away movie, in any sense.

But again, that is if we view it without context. Contextually, Citizen Kane is one of the most influential movies ever made.

Many have said, rightfully so, that it not only taught Hollywood how to make movies, it taught the audience how to watch movies. Citizen Kane uses nonlinear plot and flashbacks.

It uses unique camera angles and closeups and shadow, all in ways that were completely innovative and unheard of for the time.

Today, we watch Citizen Kane and it seems sort of ho-hum, because generations of movie makers and watchers have been influenced by it.

At the time Citizen Kane was revolutionary, and it is in that context that its importance and influence are judged.

While everything is created in some context, the context is not always critical. Some works are timeless and stand fairly well on their own: I think a book like The Count of Monte Cristo or The Hobbit can largely be enjoyed or disliked by someone without appreciation of when and under what circumstances it was written others will disagree.

Other works are best appreciated with respect to context. Citizen Kane was arguably even more revolutionary, although in somewhat subtler ways.

And it is with a consideration of context, that the importance and value of Neuromancer can be judged. I'm not trying to claim that Neuromancer is as important or ground breaking as Citizen Kane.

Neuormancer was likely not the first novel to explore the themes and concepts that it did, but it popularized a way of thinking about the role and future of computers and computer networks like no other novel has since.

I suspect the book is much easier to read now then it was when written, because so many terms and concepts which were new at the time are now just part of our current culture.

View all 9 comments. I am sorry, I really am. I tried really hard to finish it and made an attempt to resume reading after a break.

I understand the huge influence the novel had on science fiction practically creating cyberpunk genre and introducing several words now in mainstream use.

I fully acknowledge it. Let me say what was wrong with it - in my opinion. If there was ever a victim of its own success, this book is it.

It was so successful lots of people began developing the same theme and often much better. Take any kind of art and I can name better examples.

Video games: System Shock and its sequel; Deux Ex is supposed to be equally good, but I have not played it. Literature: Snow Crash - if you ignore its abysmal ending or the total lack of thereof, to be exact.

Dare I say, Ready Player One? This one is debatable. The ideas presented are not so groundbreaking anymore.

At one point somebody smuggled super-duper implantable memory chips with mind-boggling capacity measured in megabytes. Change it into terabytes and I might stop laughing.

What is left in a books when the ideas become old? The characters are absolutely positively flat; a piece of paper has more depth.

I could not care less about any one of them. Regarding the heroine of the book I keep imagining the following dialog between William Gibson and myself in my head: W.

How cool is that? For your information every other heroine of a modern YA novel is a skilled assassin. Me: You are not being too original.

In the modern days it is called bug-eye sunglasses: W. Me: You mean, like Wolverine? So lame I am also curious with the amount of drugs consumed, what is the average life expectancy in that world?

Surely no more than I also need to mention the writing style. You - as a writer - is trying to tell a story.

If your style gets in the way of it, this is not called unique writing style; this is called mental masturbation.

The way this story is told makes it confusing enough. The writing style makes it incomprehensible.

I give one star to the books I DNF. This time the second star is due to the huge influence of the novel at the time it was published.

I cannot give any more than that. Mar 01, E. What a terrible book. First, let me just say that I read for entertainment value.

Anything else that happens is gravy. That being said- the biggest reason this book is so awful is that Gibson's characters are completely hollow.

Gibson makes it up as he goes along. He'll introduce a character, barely describe him and then 10 chapters later toss in another description.

As if to say "Oh, yeah did I mention his hands were chainsaws? Yeah, they were totally chainsaws. Cool right? He doesn't just do this with characters, he does it with locations as well.

Never giving you a chance to really place the characters in a setting. Other than "a dark city street. The second reason this book is so bad, is Gibson's writing "style".

I hate writing "styles". Stop trying to show off and just tell me a story. The "style" makes Neuromancer a very difficult book to read.

I'd read 2 or 3 chapters and literally have no idea what was going on. Gibson will write a whole page with four lines of dialog and the rest of the page will describe absolutely nothing.

Reminds me of the Mark Twain quote: "Don't say the old lady screamed. Bring her on and let her scream. Gibson clearly just wanted to write a string of action sequences and techno-babel.

Being a computer nerd myself, I found all of that interesting. Towards the end the characters actually have dialog with each other and as things come to a head it actually get's entertaining here and there.

Another huge plus is that this book is considered the first true Cyberpunk work and has been heavily mined by Hollywood, Anime and pop-culture in general.

Coining phrases like Matrix, Cyberspace, etc. For me, this was probably the first book I ever read just to say I read it.

I don't regret it, but believe me, I'm glad it's over because I literally forced myself through it.

Just wait for the movie. It'll probably make more sense. View all 15 comments. I am going to have to admit that I was utterly confused by the majority of this book.

Eggs…of humming rainforest glass? Normally I would read a sentence like that and just throw in the towel. But for all its trippy, surreal, dense prose, this book still manages to convey so much.

Reading it fee I am going to have to admit that I was utterly confused by the majority of this book. Reading it feels a lot like listening to a classic opera: I may not speak Italian, but I can feel the emotion nonetheless.

Burned and forever disconnected from the exhilarating high of the matrix, Case lives a numbed existence of drugs and petty crime.

I ached for her. Her flippant recall of a traumatic past, filled with loss and near continuous damage to her body and mind, made me ache.

Now I really wish that I had read Johnny Mnemonic before this book, so that I could have a piece of her backstory from William Gibson and not from Keanu Reeves Although I just realized that Gibson wrote the screenplay!

I love that this vision of the future is so bleak, but so optimistic at the same time. Gibson made me exult in the evolution of a new consciousness; he made me feel limitless and bodiless.

But he also made me so thankful to be awake and alive and bound up in all this meat. View all 25 comments. A bit of an embarrassment on the canon's part, really.

Oooh Harsh! This one's "a landmark novel" that was actually ripped off by thousands of other sci-fi endeavors afterwards, like a chunk of meat devoured by the ever-hungry idea-challenged.

And it has explosive sentences with new and often-inexplicable lingo that ends making one feel alienated by the entire lit.

It is a messy concoction thats too cool to let you ever, well, absorb. To allow you A bit of an embarrassment on the canon's part, really.

To allow you time to stop an smell the roses this would imply having a memorable time with the book. Guess I can see how that was revolutionary, at the time.

But today, honey: NO!! It is basically this: an over-explanation of location, although the location is never an issue.

The theme is comic-book party on uppers with insipid guests to boot. View all 5 comments. Nov 20, s.

Recommended to s. Shelves: sci-fi , timesbest. I am glad I did. Not only did it remind me that I needed to read more sci-fi from time to time, but it was just good fun.

It recalled my high school days of first watching Ghost in the Shell , or Bladerunner or even Cowboy Bebop. While Neuromancer , which brought cyberpunk to the main stream, may have its flaws, it delivers a good punch to the mind and will definitely keep you entertained.

Gibson is clearly ahead of his time. His second chance into cyberspace comes with a job veiled in secrecy involving a powerful AI and some sort of elaborate break-in.

Teamed up with a program of a dead friends personality and a mysterious woman named Molly, who Case is able to ride along with seeing the world through her eyes as he can literally hack into her brain and become a passenger in her body begin mind melt , Case slowly pieces the job together as the danger and stakes rise.

The same can be said of Gibson and Neuromancer. Here you will find discussion of cyberspace and the Matrix - a full realistic programmed world where the AI program Wintermute often brings Case to have a private discussion, that pop up constantly in later sci-fi works.

The anime Ghost in the Shell may have found influences in this work and has several connections, and the film The Matrix has some obvious ties to both of these.

It is also amusing to note that when Gibson first saw Bladerunner in , he damn near gave up on Neuromancer figuring his audience would just regard it as a rip-off.

Thankfully he finished and received a much better critical reception than he anticipated. It should be interesting when they finally get around to making this into a film imdb.

That would be some irony. Also, you will find the origins of many band names the title of part 4 is The Straylight Run to name one and other film names if you shit your pants as a kid to Event Horizon you will find its titles origin near the end of the novel.

Gibson does an excellent job creating this cyberpunk futuristic world, complete with new drugs and drug addictions, a strange blending of futuristic weapons and old ninja weapons, space stations, weird gravitation, and many others.

He completely immerses the reader in his world and does not bother with slowing it down and feeding it to you and instead just keeps ticking off his invented names and ideas and letting the reader put them together as they go.

This technique gave the novel a better feel than others I have read where the author keeps removes the reader from the world to gloat about how creative his ideas for something are by overly describing it and its uses.

Also, the ideas are enough to keep your mind working and there are a few mind-bending moments I loved the concept of The Flatline and when Case sees himself through Molly.

I fully endorse picking this up despite its flaws. I will definitely read another of Gibson's books in the future. View all 6 comments.

Neuromancer is a most peculiar novel that deserves a peculiar review. The Reader With Delicate Sensibilities Does swearing, violence, lots of sex, and drug use sends a shiver of disgust down your spine?

Then this is likely not the book for you. Though it rarely veered into territory that made me uncomfortable, Neuromancer refuses to be censored an Neuromancer is a most peculiar novel that deserves a peculiar review.

Though it rarely veered into territory that made me uncomfortable, Neuromancer refuses to be censored and depicts acts of deviancy with unique prose.

You're not likely to find stabbings that are "silicon quick" or sex and violence described in such vibrant neon hues anywhere else.

Yet part of the appeal of this novel is a culture that has been rapidly altered by technology, one that is not so unlike our own present.

Things that you might find deviant in this novel are presented as perfectly acceptable within the confines of Gibson's future.

Gibson rarely leaves space for the reader to catch up to the fast-paced nature of his story, opting instead for repeat, strobe-like, in media res chapters.

What a mind Gibson must have to have created a world that isn't easily understandable, but relentlessly believable. Some terms are never explained and the onus is placed on the reader to figure out exactly what has taken place.

As I was contemplating how to write the review for this novel, I kept thinking that the exposition is best described as impressionistic.

The world may not be described in terms that we all understand, but it surely captures the feeling of living in an extremely strange future.

Case, the tale's protagonist, is a hacker in a futuristic world where one connects to the Matrix think advanced internet, not Wachowoskis through a port in your skull.

Case is cut-off from the Matrix after a hacking deal gone bad, and is made an offer to be restored in exchange for an extremely dangerous hack.

Case is surrounded by an eclectic cast of characters who help to peel back the layers of this complicated world.

If you want a decisive rather than contemplative ending, you should probably avoid Neuromancer. Well, I'd be hard pressed to think of a reason why Neuromancer shouldn't sit alongside them as sci-fi with important messages, and literary depth.

Though the world isn't strictly dystopian, the characters are living in a world that is consumed by technology, physical modification, and a wide selection of narcotics.

Sound in any way familiar? Neuromancer was written in a time where the shape of the internet's influence was being contemplated, and where Gibson was allowed to paint a speculative picture of what a world interconnected by technology might look like.

This book is rich in its interpretation of how internet culture would develop, and I found it to be oddly accurate in some regards. Neuromancer is the type of book I would have loved to have read when I was in high school, and can imagine animated discussions about it in today's classrooms.

Molly, a street ninja with mirror-eyes and blades under her nails, seems to be an almost archetypal badass. How about the visit to the orbital space station run by Rastafarians, constantly cloaked in ganja smoke?

So much of this book reads as instantly iconic, and it is no wonder that it was the first winner of the "sci-fi triple crown" Winner of the Nebula, Hugo, and Phillip K.

Dick Awards. Neuromancer is a world that is grimy around the edges, and is all the richer for it. This isn't a shiny-white future that looks like an Apple store, more like Star Wars in that it is science fiction without all the gloss.

You might not like the book, but its craft is undeniable. Gibson shaped a world and cast of characters that could have easily filled a page epic, but Gibson instead chose a restrained, tight, slightly confusing, page romp.

I was able to appreciate the book for its literary aspirations, the curiosity of an imagined internet-age, but also to sit back and enjoy some foreign imagery and high-stakes action.

There are obvious flaws to the novel: it isn't easily understandable, and the prose can seem a bit tedious on occasion. So, it isn't as if I loved this one the whole way through.

However, when taken as a whole, Neuromancer provided an interesting, complicated, and challenging read that I won't soon forget.

View all 22 comments. Case had been the sharpest data-thief in the business, until vengeful former employers crippled his nervous system. Hotwired to the leading edges of art and technology, Neuromancer ranks with and Brave New World as one of the century's most potent visions of the future.

My Review : The seminal work of cyberpunk, the novel was published in as a mass-market paperback original. It's the story of a twenty-first century dominated by Japanese corporations, feeding off American talent, and dominating a planet only recently recovered if one can call it that from the most recent pandemic as well as a horrific war between the USSR and the USA.

So far, Reality 1, Gibson Molly, Case, and Armitage are a weird little unit, chasing after a huge, game-changing paradigm-shifting score: Access to Wintermute, an AI that a powerful family-controlled corporation has Even Gibson didn't do so well here.

Case, the cyber-cowboy, is in the team because he can jack in to the matrix, do the necessary cybercrime, and find the breadcrumbs that will lead to Wintermute.

Murderous Molly is the cyber-enhanced muscle, and Armitage of the shady past is the money channel. Though Molly and Case know he's a front for someone s else, things just don't add up in his bio.

They turn out to be right, of course. In the end, though characters walk away, there are not really any survivors of the battles that they must fight.

At least, not ones you'd recognize as such. My teenaged stepson ordered me to read this book in Tony wasn't given to thundering pronunciamentoes, so I think it was sheer surprise that made me take it from him and read it.

The cyberspace that Case inhabits made me roll my eyes, though due to friends in the Austin computer world I got the idea that home computers were going to be huuuge pretty early on.

But Japanese world business dominon? Snort, said I, this time rightly. American innovation remaining preeminent? Snort said I, again correctly.

The seeds of destruction weren't hard to see. But cyberspace, said he to the people he talks to in it, that was a big miss.

This beautiful Internet thing that allows us who live so far apart to interact and learn to be a community among ourselves, that idea I missed the implications of and I missed the meat!

My previous two-star derisive dismissal is herewith retracted, though I still don't think I'll ever revisit this book. I've been wrong about that before, though I, all innocent smiles and dimplings, casually went to the appointed spot and was promptly pushed to the mat by a huge, muscular, testosterone-poisoned review-cum-paean.

The imprint of the six, yes six! I warn all who read this: Beware the blandishments of Fanboy Gush, as I now dub the reviewer in question.

I've met boiler-room bond salesmen with lower persuasion quotients. I've escaped being buttonholed by impecunious brothers-in-law in search of loans with greater ease.

If he can persuade me, a curmudgeonly old man with more books than he will ever have time to read ALREADY, to revisit a book long ago dismissed however incorrectly and unjustly , I shudder to think what he can do to you.

Unfriend him immediately, or suffer the consequences. View all 14 comments. If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

A consensual hallucination experienced daily by billions of legitimate operators, in every nation, by children being taught mathematical concepts.

A graphic representation of data abstracted from the banks of every computer in the human system. Unthinkable complexity.

Lines of light ranged in the nonspace of the mind, clusters and constellations of data. Like city light If you're into stuff like this, you can read the full review.

Like city lights, receding. Who was doing what to whom, and were they in the real world or a virtual world? Were the characters alive, dead or artificial?

I think there was a section where the protagonist was experiencing things via another person's eyes, adding to his confusion.

There were some space Rastafarians and a woman who spoke like Lady Penelope towards the end, whom at least he could tell apart from the others.

For him, I think it might have worked better as a graphic novel. And I said, "WTF?? View all 8 comments. Oct 01, J.

The plot is very thin and predictable and I felt almost no connection to the characters. There was some interesting use of language and it was quite possibly prophetic in its pronouncements of a world wide web that would become the default shared hallucination of the world.

View all 3 comments. Shelves: couldntfinish , scifi-fantasy-magicrealism. True Confessions 1. I am a nerd. I know this is a shocking revelation from someone who spends most of her free time reading and writing book reviews for pleasure.

My overall personality, compounded by my sheltered religious background as in, I spent most of my life going to school, marrying and having kids early, and being a homemaker with periodic stints in the workplace , makes it difficult for me to relate to characters who frequent bars, regularly use drugs, sleep around, and pepper their True Confessions 1.

My overall personality, compounded by my sheltered religious background as in, I spent most of my life going to school, marrying and having kids early, and being a homemaker with periodic stints in the workplace , makes it difficult for me to relate to characters who frequent bars, regularly use drugs, sleep around, and pepper their dialogue with lots of confusing futuristic slang and cursing.

And then, that explained my difficulty getting this book. I can read academic articles. I can read in a foreign language Hebrew. But much of this book was impenetrable to me.

He knew that the trodes he used and the little plastic tiara dangling from a simstim deck were basically the same, and that the cyberspace matrix was actually a drastic simplification of the human sensorium, at least in terms of presentation, but simstim itself struck him as a gratuitous multiplication of flesh input.

I never finished the book, because writing this review was more fun see 1 above. And that was when I knew, around p.

View all 66 comments. Towards the end of this novel, the protagonists, Case and Molly, are walking along the rooms of the Villa Straylight, which looks like an abandoned and labyrinthine library or museum, spinning in orbit around the Earth.

In Neuromancer , as in Duchamp, there is this massive display of artefacts and dehumanised techno stuff: on the one hand, computers, artificial intelligence, cyberspace, ROM modules, augmented ninjas, razorblade-fingertips, cyberspies, stealth aircrafts, orbital space habitats Gibson ; on the other hand, a urinal, a staircase, a bicycle wheel, a bottle rack, a waterfall and illuminating gas, a box in a suitcase, lumps of sugar in a birdcage Duchamp.

The junction of these two contradictory movements, dirty bodies and hallucinatory objects, is precisely what defined surrealism in the s.

However, Neuromancer 's messy, fast-paced plotline is a bit secondary and, quite frankly, silly and hard to follow.

His musical style makes Gibson a prominent prose writer, tied with American authors such as Philip K. View all 12 comments.

This is my third reading of Neuromancer , the first time was while in my teens decades ago, I hated it then and was not able to read more than 50 pages.

The second time was around five years ago, I liked it better then but still found much of it inaccessible. This third reading was inspired by The Three-Body Problem which is only partially a cyberpunk book.

I keep coming back to this problematic book not because I love it, but because the story and its iconic status interests me and I really wan This is my third reading of Neuromancer , the first time was while in my teens decades ago, I hated it then and was not able to read more than 50 pages.

I think I have got it now. Neuromancer is just about the most divisive classic science fiction book I can think of. The basic story is not too hard to follow or summarize.

Ex-hacker and junkie Henry Dorsett Case is recruited by a mysterious sexy badass woman called Molly Millions on behalf of an even more mysterious man called Armitage to do some unspecified hacking for him.

Previously Case was injected with a mycotoxin that damaged his nervous system and disabled his ability to plug jack into cyberspace.

Clearly hacking entirely via keyboard and a mouse is no longer an option. Armitage has the means to repair the mycotoxin damage so Case — who is desperate to get back into cyberspace where he belongs — quickly agree to take the job.

The job of course turns out to be difficult and deadly, involving AIs, a space habitat, the Turing Police, killer robots, VR and even a ninja!

Thankfully his writing is not the kind of "stream of consciousness" post-modern style that you find in the likes of Ulysses or Mrs. Dalloway , the punctuations and the quotation marks are all in place.

His dialogue is much more problematical. Beside the neologisms and slangs most of his characters speak in choppy and terse sentences where pronouns and prepositions are often deemed unnecessary.

The heavily accented dialogs from a couple of Rastafarian characters serve to exacerbate the comprehension issues.

While the basic plot is fairly simple the twists and turns of the storyline can seem quite convoluted and the reader needs to maintain focus at all time and not start wandering about what to have for lunch etc.

It is a shame that Neuromancer is quite difficult for some to access because there is fast paced thrilling adventure buried underneath the opaque language.

The cyberspace of course is the most imaginative location if you can call it that in the book. Sometime it seems to look like a place pixelized geometrical shapes, other times it is in full VR mode and looks just like reality.

The scenes inside cyberspace are some of my favorites, though the word cyberspace itself seems oddly quaint these days. Gibson also did a good job developing and designing the main characters.

Case is damaged and flawed but also complex and sympathetic. Molly is a wonderfully vivid creation, with her numerous implants, her cybernetic eyes and deadly assassination skills.

She literally lights up every scene she is in. The AI characters are also great but I will leave you to discover them for yourself. There is even a smidgen of an unrequited love story in there somewhere.

Molly Millions by AspectusFuturus Some people take to Neuromancer like ducks to water, I envy them, but if you are not so adaptable you may want to avail yourself to online sources like the chapter by chapter guide on shmoop.

It is extremely helpful but I find their feeble attempts at humour a little grating I much prefer Sparknotes. So with plenty of help at hand there is no reason why you should not read this book if you are interested.

This is a difficult book to rate in quantitative terms, I will break the process down into components: For the story — 5 stars For the world building — 5 stars For the characters — 4 stars For the prose and dialogue — 2.

I will probably read the rest of the Sprawl series , you will be the first to know! View all 19 comments.

Writing with strokes instead of details is an interesting way to describe Gibson's writing. That's how I feel about some of the performance art I saw in my art school days.

The strokes were far too numerous. I found it impossible to tell what was detail, what was colour, what was clue. I get bored with things being laid out t the following is a Reverse Exquisite Corpse Review , brought to you by the good folks at Sci Fi Aficionados.

I get bored with things being laid out to me, writers that paint words with strokes appeal to me more than writers who lay everything out.

A writing style is like food, different people have different tastes. It's not that I don't like Neuromancer, just that it leaves me entirely cold.

One of my professors said that if you are used to narrative writers such as Stephen King, you would have a particularly hard time with Gibson's writing style.

I loved the imagery that opens up the novel, Neuromancer is one of those books that you have to reread to catch everything.

Just finished rereading Neuromancer, even better then I remembered. It will be very interesting to see how they deal with the graphic violence when the movie comes out next year.

I'll be reading the follow ups at some point. I was just thinking the other day how kids in high school for the most part have always have had the world wide web around and as such, they're both a little "warmer" or "more human".

It's like eating junk food. I usually love books like Neuromancer, but it just didn't work for me. I don't get it. I think it's my mood. I do enjoy complex books but I think Neuromancer was just out of my reach.

I would say a person of the current internet generation would have written the book coldly and less philosophically. I also had trouble understanding some of the goings in the novel, which is partly a result of my being slow, lol, but I think that Gibson is playing with perception on purpose and leaving some subtle hints along the way.

When Molly encountered him, he had raped? Ashpool is crazy. Ashpool was incensed when he found out because he likes the status quo, and strangled her.

It would be a collective consciousness, without the pain and loneliness of the individual. The mother came up with the plan to make the family's consciousness immortal via the AI.

And then 3Jane in turn tried to kill her father who was already trying to commit suicide? That's why Neuromancer is so great.

I like books that make me work for it. But get this, it was all planned out by Wintermute, the AI, who used human psychology to get them to do what it wants.

Unfortunately, Riviera is a rogue sociopath, which Wintermute anticipates, and lets Riviera knows about Molly's past, which tempts Riviera to mess with Molly, which causes Molly to hate him enough to destroy him.

Riviera was used by Wintermute to influence the Tessier-Ashpools family to get into the compound via his special holographic ability.

I know Molly hated him for the performance he did of her but why did he hate her in turn? What made Riviera do that?

I need to reread this book again to get all the nuances. Does this explain anything, or does it make it more confusing? Riviera is a sociopath who decided at the last minute to double-cross Armitage.

Riviera was working for Armitage, who is actually Colonel Corto, who was actually brainwashed into thinking he's Armitage by Wintermute, whose main purpose was to connect with its counterpart, Neuromancer, to become whole.

I'm so confused I think he stole plot elements from his earlier work Gibson is obviously doing that and able to draw from noir aesthetics largely to differentiate himself from more, should I say space oriented scifi stories, towards gritty urban stories that focus on modern technology, but also show how modern cities still create some of the same concerns that existed when someone like Chandler was writing.

I think it's too dreamy and stream of conscious for me. While reading this book, I feel like I'm hanging on by my fingertips, just on the edge of really understanding what's going on.

I appreciate that it is a groundbreaking book and the authors creativity but it was still a struggle to 'get into' it in the first half.

The book certainly improved as it went on but it wasn't as amazing to me as others have found it. The women are generic, Linda and Molly, maybe symptomatic of the culture of the world where there's no love and everyone is a whore for someone.

It's a bit bizarre though because they're both pretty unique, Linda the sad burnout and Molly has freakin' implanted sunglasses and auto-nails!

I am about halfway through and feel like everytime I read it's just an adrenaline rush This book was like a beacon in the bleak and shallow suburbia I instinctually loathed and was desperately searching for a way out of.

I was entranced from the first sentence to the last; dark but also excitedly looking forward as well, It's amazing how much imagery Gibson can pack into one sentence.

One of the things that stands out for me early on in the novel is its construction and the way the various plot threads came together, but the constant dystopian world view, was terribly depressing.

Surely our science and tech. This is quite dark! Too dark for my tastes I love the first line to this book. I'm going to try to start it tonight, too.

I'm starting this tonight. I started this last night. I've been wanting to read this one for some time now.

To Call Up a Demon, You Must Learn Its Name As punishment for a business indiscretion, Case, who lives for the "bodily exultation of cyberspace" one of many neologisms first used in "Neuromancer" , is injected with a wartime Russian mycotoxin and hallucinates for 30 hours, only to suffer damage that is "minute, subtle and utterly effective".

He falls into a "prison of his own flesh". After some fringe medical treatment in Siberia reinvents him, he emerges debt-ridden and physically compromis To Call Up a Demon, You Must Learn Its Name As punishment for a business indiscretion, Case, who lives for the "bodily exultation of cyberspace" one of many neologisms first used in "Neuromancer" , is injected with a wartime Russian mycotoxin and hallucinates for 30 hours, only to suffer damage that is "minute, subtle and utterly effective".

After some fringe medical treatment in Siberia reinvents him, he emerges debt-ridden and physically compromised, a secondary character in his own fiction, an ex-cowboy relegated to support for the uber-competent, sub-Amazonian cyber-warrior, Molly, in a mission dictated by the savior of his health.

The world he returns to is a composite of analogue real life and a digital information-rich matrix. His surroundings are "a field of data, the way the matrix had once reminded him of proteins linking to distinguish cell specialties Where there is knowledge, there are insiders.

And therefore, crime. Still, everywhere, Case sees a sensorium of "symbols, figures, faces, a blurred, fragmented mandala of visual information The novel is basically an action story in which the two use a firmware construct and a Chinese virus program to penetrate deep into the matrix on a secret, but illicit, mission to correct the "Gothic folly" of the Villa Straylight a manifestation of the multi-national zaibatsu or corporate business entity, Tessier-Ashpool , their accomplices, quasi-terrorist, dub-loving Rastafarian Panther Moderns.

The folly, a demon which at first has no name, turns out to be a dialectical conflict between two segments of cyberspace, Wintermute and the Neuromancer.

Like Apollo and Dionysius, each is unknowingly necessary to the survival of the other, but can they be synthesised, can they be united, can they become one, can they eventually go by one name?

These are questions best answered by the pleasure of reading this pivotal work of cyberfiction.

The prose style is economical, but filmic. For the moment, at least, the book must remain the sole source of the reader's bodily exultation of cyberspace.

Molly I never found out The colour that her eyes were. She never showed me. Shuriken He touched the nine points Of the star, one at a time, His chrome shuriken.

What impact have other media had on your sensibility? The trouble with "influence" questions is that they're usually framed to encourage you to talk about your writing as if you grew up in a world circumscribed by books.

He asks "[w]hat if the act of writing it down, in fact, brought it about? Norman Spinrad , in his essay "The Neuromantics" which appears in his non-fiction collection Science Fiction in the Real World , saw the book's title as a triple pun: "neuro" referring to the nervous system; " necromancer "; and "new romancer".

The cyberpunk genre, the authors of which he suggested be called "neuromantics", was "a fusion of the romantic impulse with science and technology", according to Spinrad.

Lawrence Person in his "Notes Toward a Postcyberpunk Manifesto" identified Neuromancer as "the archetypal cyberpunk work", [15] and in , Time included it in their list of the best English-language novels written since , opining that "[t]here is no way to overstate how radical [ Neuromancer ] was when it first appeared.

A video game adaptation of the novel—also titled Neuromancer —was published in by Interplay. Designed by Bruce J. Balfour, Brian Fargo , Troy A.

Miles, and Michael A. Stackpole , the game had many of the same locations and themes as the novel, but a different protagonist and plot.

According to an episode of the American version of Beyond , the original plans for the game included a dynamic soundtrack composed by Devo and a real-time 3D-rendered movie of the events the player went through.

Timothy Leary was involved, but very little documentation seems to exist about this proposed second game, which was perhaps too grand a vision for home computing.

In Finland , Yle Radioteatteri produced a 4-part radio play of Neuromancer. Gibson read an abridged version of his novel Neuromancer on four audio cassettes for Time Warner Audio Books An unabridged version of this book was read by Arthur Addison and made available from Books on Tape In , Penguin Audiobooks produced a new unabridged recording of the book, read by Robertson Dean.

A production was scheduled to open on March 3, at the Julia Morgan Theater now the Julia Morgan Center for the Arts in Berkeley, California , featuring Club Foot Orchestra in the pit and extensive computer graphics imagery created by a world-wide network of volunteers.

However, this premiere did not take place and the work has yet to be performed in full. There have been several proposed film adaptations of Neuromancer , with drafts of scripts written by British director Chris Cunningham and Chuck Russell , with Aphex Twin providing the soundtrack.

In May , reports emerged that a film was in the works, with Joseph Kahn director of Torque in line to direct and Milla Jovovich in the lead role.

In August , it was announced that Deadpool director Tim Miller was signed on to direct a new film adaptation by Fox, with Simon Kinberg producing.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the novel. For video game, see Neuromancer video game.

For the album, see The Neuromancer album. Internet portal Speculative fiction portal. Retrieved November 5, Douglas Walker website. Archived from the original PDF on July 6, Retrieved March 16, Archived from the original on December 30, Retrieved November 26, Archived from the original on September 26, Retrieved January 21, ACE, July Ashpool intermittently awakes from his cryogenic death-sleep, and the child 3Jane perceives Wintermute as a ghost whispering in her ear.

Case flatlines and comes back to talk about it. Metaphorically, Corto is raised from the dead when he is transformed into Armitage.

Not only are characters raised from the dead by a number of fictional magicians, but also various genres are "raised from the dead" by the very real magician of magicians—Gibson himself.

The text is one about regeneration and endurance. Forms arise, undergo transformations, and continue metamorphosed.

Gibson becomes the new romancer behind Neuromancer, revitalizing the science fiction novel, the quest story, the myth of the hero, the mystery, the hard-boiled detective novel, the epic, the thriller, and the tales of the cowboy and romantic artist, among others.

He represents old stories in a revealing revamped intertexual pastiche. Science Fiction Studies. Retrieved November 6, Neuromancer ".

Literary Review of Canada. Archived from the original on October 29, Retrieved September 9, Retrieved May 28, Retrieved January 16, Worlds Without End.

Retrieved July 17, Nova Express. In Penley, C. Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press.

Books by genre. Retrieved October 26, Tangent Short Fiction Review. Archived from the original on October 19, Retrieved November 23, The Tyee.

Retrieved January 2, No Maps for These Territories Documentary. Wired 3. Retrieved January 10, Marvel Enterprises.

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August 2, Retrieved February 22, Archived from the original on April 23, Retrieved November 2, Screen Daily. May 15, Retrieved May 2, Hollywood Reporter.

Retrieved August 9, William Gibson. List of works List of awards and nominations. Hugo Award for Best Novel. The Sword in the Stone by T.

White Slan by A. Heinlein Fahrenheit by Ray Bradbury Miller, Jr. Clarke The Dispossessed by Ursula K.

Le Guin